first visit 2012

Garinish IslandGarinish Island opened very late this year. So missed the blooms of some of the most marvellous camellias. But the lovely Michelia doltsopa (new name Magnolia doltsopa) is in full flower.

Garinish IslandThe scent of the ivory whitish blooms depends on the stage of opening of the buds, at it’s height it is clearly lemony with a hint of vanilla and clove, really mouth watering.

Advertisements

roland bryce of garinish island

Garinish Island GlengarriffAfter Violet Bryce, the co-founder of Garinish Island (or Ilnacullin as she preferred to name it) died, her son Roland L’Estrange Bryce continued her work. The passionate amateur botanist and gardener further developped the plantings together with head gardener Murdo Mackenzie. Roland suffered from very poor eyesight and – according to photographs of his later years – from obesity. After he fell ill during a visit to London the had to undergo surgery but he died on 4th December 1953 at the age of 64 in a hospital quite near to his former family home in Marylebone but was laid to rest at “The Abbey” in Bantry. He bequeathed the garden island “to the Irish people”. In a newspaper from 1940 article he was described:

Here is a big broad-shouldered man, red-haired, bushy thickets of eye-brows above his sholarly spectacles, open-complexioned, very Irish – and proud of it. His broad sturv hands touch a plant with the gentleness of a surgeon – are they not the children of his mind and imagination, and of his daily care? Over steep paths, along bays lined with tall birches and over terraces with fountains smothered under maidenhair, we come back to the little house, so hidden in the foliage that no tourists ever espy it. Electric light (1940!) glows up over the hundreds of books on the white lacquered shelves. The Squire of Ilnacullin speaks of Oxford, were he studied; of Belgrade, where he was Times correspondent; of Carinthia and Montenegro, where as a diplomat he supervised plebiscites and elections. Tea is poured from a lovely silver hair-loom. Fritz, the big silver-haired Schnauzerdog, inspects the home-made cakes.

Various obituaries described his career and his passion:

Mr. Bryce was a well known horticulturist. He retired to Garnish Island on the death of his father and added to and maintained the already well-known collection.

After a distinguished course at Oxford Mr. Bryce became attached to the British Foreign Office and served in the 1914-18 war. His attachment to Glengarriff was so keen that he sacrificed his career to take up permanent residence there. He was later entrusted with the task of settling the boundaries of Yugoslavia, then Serbia. His father was Liberal M.P. for Aberdeen in 1917 and his uncle, Lord James Bryce, was at one time Chief Secretary in Ireland.
Mr. Bryce was at one time Vice-President of the Royal Horticultural Society of Ireland and Governor of the Collge of St. Columba, Rathfarnham, Co. Dublin. He was also president of the Glengarriff Tourist Development Association and the local golf club.
Mr. Roland L’Estrange Bryce has been appointed peace commissioner for the County Cork and the adjoining counties in 1939.

the east pier on garinish island

garinish island glengarriffThe east pier was used by the British Army to build the Martello Tower and the adjacent fortification around 1805 (works probably until around 1815, men living there for approximately ten years). Like the East Garden (which is probably completely overgrown) it is closed to the public. There are plans though for it to be repaired so the works on the ‘Gardner’s Cottage’ (Violet and Roland Bryce’s home from the early 20ies till 1953 and Murdo Mackenzie’s and Maggie Sullivan’s home till 1999) can be done by this entrance to the island. On this old postcard (probably taken around 1905 by Robert French for the ‘Lawrence Collection’) you can clearly see that Garinish Island wasn’t a ‘bare rock’ as often stated. A widow and her four sons lived in the cottage at the East Pier, they had cattle (seen on the headers left sepia photograph) and grew (probably) their got their livelihood from those fields below the tower. All of that part of the Garinish Island is unaccessible for the public (what a shame, so much space for the many tourists visiting the island).

garinish island glengarriffFrom there you had lovely views towards Reenmeen, Dromgarriff and Hollyhill – on this old postcard you can see Glengarriff Castle. How the pier looks these days can be seen here.

the soil on garnish island

garnish island glengarriffIt is thought that the Bryces brought over tons of topsoil from the mainland, but this is only speculation, as there was a ‘quarry for soil’ marked on Harold Peto’s map of Garinish Island. American writer Harold Speakman (1888-1928) describes his encounter with Violet Bryce in „Here’s Ireland“ (1925):

The lady greeted me cordially. ‚I hope,’ she said, as we went up a path made rich by the scent of early roses, ‚I hope that you haven’t heard the ridiculous story about our bringing boatloads of earth here from the mainland!’ ‚Millions of boatloads…’ I quoted. ‚Now where could you have heard that!’ she demanded with some warmth. ‚I never knew anything so stupid!’ ‚It was an old woman coming over the hill,’ I said. ‚But it doesn’t seem so bad to me. If a place were barren and one wanted to live here, why shouldn’t soil be brought from anywhere?’ She looked at me imperiously and a little scournfully. (Evidently this was a subject of long standing and some delicacy.) ‚In the first place, there isn’t land on the mainland to take away; in the second, the thing is too silly. I can’t imagine any one doing a thing like that – except perhaps an American millionaire!’ ‚Whew! This isn’t beginning very well,’ I thought. But in another moment she had forgotten her annoyance and was showing me a path so completely carpeted with fallen pink blossoms that in places it was entirely hidden from sight.

However it took years to enrich the existing thin peaty soils which was mainly Murdo Mackenzie’s achievement as he was known to collect leaves and other natural debris from the mainland to enrich his compost heap. In the Irish Times from 13 February 1931 the issue was described as follows:

The greatest compliment paid to Mrs. Bryce is the legend that all the soil for the garden had to be imported: some say from the mainland, and some say from England. This of course is quite incorrect, the fertility of the island being due to its own soil and climate, together with a great deal of well applied industry. In fact there is no reason why the mainland should not yield the same results if properly cultivated, and the possibility of fruit-farming in the district is one that could well be investigated.

© of Harold Peto’s map: OPW Office of Public Works, Dublin

the last days of the season

garinish island glengarriff

A particular lovely morning, we are on our last trip to Garinish Island in 2011. You see it as the dark silhouette at the right side of the photograph.

garinish island glengarriffThere are still flowering shrubs like those two miniature fuchsias in pink and in crimson red and also most of the Eucryphias. Some leaves are as pretty as flowers like those of the huckleberry (Gaylussacia).

garinish island glengarriffEucryphia lucida pleases with a lovely smell reminding of jasmine.

garinish island glengarriffOne of Murdo Mackenzie’s favourite plants were all kinds of Acer palmatum (Japanese Maple). This species Acer palmatum ‘Dissectum Atropurpureum’ in the Happy Valley looks like a burning bush as it is well placed in front of dark foliage.

garinish island glengarriffGaultheria mucronata (former Pernettya) from Chile and Argentina thrives well in the acidic soil of the island, the beautiful berries are grown for food in South America but their taste is quite neutral. To grow the fruits you have to plant shrubs of different sexes.

enjoy the last island-days for 2011

Garinish Island GlengarriffJust a few more days left to admire the autumnal atmosphere on Garinish Island for this year. And to have a look at the remaining wonderful dahlias in the walled garden. The mexican flowers got their name from the renowed Swedish botanist Anders Dahl (1751-1789).

Garinish Island GlengarriffThose are the beautiful leaves from Gaylussacia ursina, the Bear Huckleberry.